Frankie Naylor Sports Therapy

Being short staffed – the straw that broke the camel’s back!

How many did you muck out today, ride out or feed? Yesterday I heard of someone that mucked out 35 and fed 105. How long can one person sustain this type of workload and what is the impact on their body?

Every day I treat people working in the horse racing industry who have physical jobs. Chronic injuries are part and parcel (to an extent).

Over the last few years I have noticed that workloads have increased significantly due to staff shortages. Chronic injuries are at epidemic levels.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2019/may/14/talking-horses-new -study-finds-unsustainable-workloads-in-horse-racing

As a sports therapist the pattern of injury I see specifically is when an individual has to work on their weekend off or work that extra race meeting due to staff shortages and……… ‘Boom’ you’ve guessed it, it’s the straw that really did break the camel’s back! And that’s when they end up on my couch. A significant portion of their wage packet being forked out because they haven’t had that all important day and a half off out of fourteen to recover.

Chronic lower back pain and shoulder impingements are of the most common issues I see. Both which require a degree of rest from painful activities – but alas not in racing!

Many people leave racing at least in part because they feel that their bodies just cannot sustain the workloads long term (I know, they’ve told me!). This creates a tougher environment for the individuals left behind as they are having to make up the shortfall. And thus every pursuing injury happens a little sooner than the last as workloads increase and the next staff member hangs up their boots for a less physical role.

In addition as a nation we are seeing a population of young people with lower base fitness levels than ever. This is due to increases in automation coupled with poor diet and lifestyle choices. So the individuals coming into racing are more likely not to be fit for purpose, and are expected to take on greater workloads (as well as being Millennials!)…… and you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to predict the end result.

So what next? Chronic injuries are just one result of the staffing crisis. Housing, pay, amongst other issues all play their part too. Some trainers have confronted these situations head on creating far better working environments like good quality staff accommodation. Although this doesn’t directly impact on injury status. Will trainers have to consider investing in injury prevention for staff like they do for their horses?

Would you welcome injury treatments as part of a stable staff employment package? Let me know your thoughts. Comment, like, share.

If you work in racing and are struggling with an injury you can get in touch with Racing Welfare at racingwelfare.co.uk

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